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The JungleOctober 16, 20186min0

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) – Dutch navigation firm TomTom (TOM2.AS) said on Tuesday it had lost a contract with carmaker Volvo, overshadowing a forecast-beating earnings report to knock shares as much as 9 percent lower.

FILE PHOTO: TomTom navigation are seen in front of TomTom displayed logo in this illustration taken July 28, 2017. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/File Photo

The company said the contract to provide location and navigation services to Volvo, which was announced in 2016, had been ended before it was due to go into force in 2019.

That fed into fears of critics who said a deal Google (GOOGL.O) made last month with Renault (RENA.PA), another TomTom customer, meant the company risked being relegated to third place in its main market, with lower margins.

Volvo could not immediately be reached for comment on the contract. ING analysts said in a trading note that they believe the Swedish carmaker had switched to Google, rather than the current leading player in the navigation market, HERE.

“Now that Google is making inroads, the mapping business has become a three-player market with TomTom, HERE and Google, which is clearly less attractive for TomTom than the two-player market it was before,” they said.

TomTom shares lost a quarter of their value in one day on Sept. 18 after Google announced a far-reaching supply deal with a group of carmakers including Renault, Nissan (7201.T) and Mitsubishi (7211.T).

Though the Volvo news knocked shares lower, TomTom reported better than expected third-quarter results on Tuesday, with core earnings rising to 62.4 million euros ($72.2 million) from 35.5 million euros a year earlier.

A company-compiled consensus had seen earnings for the quarter before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) at 41 million euros.

Group sales were fractionally higher at 220 million euros, from 219 million euros in the third quarter of 2017.

While sales of the company’s traditional satnav devices continued to fall, that was offset by sales to carmakers and map licensing to customers Apple (AAPL.O) and Uber [UBER.UL].

The company also raised its full-year revenue outlook to 850 million euros from 825 million euros.

TomTom this month announced plans to sell its fleet management business, saying it would instead focus its energy on making digital maps used in highly automated driving — the business on which it has pinned its future.

It said it has seen “strong interest” for the fleet subsidiary, valued at roughly 700 million euros.

Chief executive and co-founder Harold Goddijn said recent new deals with Peugeot (PEUP.PA) and BMW (BMWG.DE) showed the viability of the company’s products.

Reporting by Toby Sterling; Editing by Subhranshu Sahu, Louise Heavens and Jan Harvey

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The JungleOctober 16, 201858min0

What is 5G?

5G networks are the next generation of mobile internet connectivity, offering faster speeds and more reliable connections on smartphones and other devices than ever before.

Combining cutting-edge network technology and the very latest research, 5G should offer connections that are multitudes faster than current connections, with average download speeds of around 1GBps expected to soon be the norm.

The networks will help power a huge rise in Internet of Things technology, providing the infrastructure needed to carry huge amounts of data, allowing for a smarter and more connected world.

With development well underway, 5G networks are expected to launch across the world by 2020, working alongside existing 3G and 4G technology to provide speedier connections that stay online no matter where you are.

When will 5G launch?

– 5G technology is expected to officially launch across the world by 2020

– The US, China and South Korea are expected to be some of the first nations to install full 5G networks, with others including the UK not far behind

– Many companies are busy making sure their networks and devices are ‘5G ready’ in time for 2020, meaning some networks may launch before then

5G – the latest news

15/10 – PRODUCTSUS senators urge Canada to ‘ban’ Huawei from 5G deploymentUS senators fear Huawei kit could harm US national security…

12/10 – PRODUCTS New Nokia kit promises more rapid and effective 5G FWA deploymentsOperators can get new high gain antennas and gateways…

12/10 – NETWORKSDeutsche Telekom plots 99 per cent 5G coverage by 2025German operator details plans for 5G rollout…

08/10 – ANALYSISDifferences in early 5G services will make it a ‘marketing headache’Analysts predict difficulties in 5G marketing as mobile broadband will be key adoption driver…

05/10 – NETWORKSEE switches on ‘UK’s first’ 5G trial network at Canary WharfEE gears up for 2019 5G launch…

04/10 – NETWORKSHuawei tells FCC that US ban could mean country falls behind in 5GHuawei hasn’t given up hope in playing US 5G role…

01/10 – INNOVATIONSamsung partners with AT&T to build a 5G tech labFacility will research ways 5G could improve manufacturing…

01/10 – NETWORKSVerizon turns on the world’s first 5G networkLaunch across four US cities could be a major landmark in the development of 5G…

28/09 – NETWORKSDigital Catapult switches on Brighton 5G testbedUK’s latest 5G testbed goes live on the South Coast…

26/09 – ANALYSISCould 5G networks herald the arrival of a four-day work week? Increased productivity as a result of 5G powered technologies could disrupt the traditional work week…

25/09 – DEVICESManufacturers hope 5G and foldable displays will drive smartphone growthAnalysts believe the smartphone will be unrecognisable by 2027…

24/09 – NETWORKSWIG raises £220m for 5G infrastructureWIG to use additional funding for small cells and fibre…

21/09 – NETWORKSVodafone targets cities and rural areas for 2019 5G launchCornwall and the Lake District will be first to get Vodafone 5G…

12/09 – NETWORKST-Mobile signs $3.5bn 5G network deal with EricssonT-Mobile secures second major 5G equipment deal…

11/09 – NETWORKSEE could launch the UK’s first 5G network in 2019EE reallocates 3G spectrum ahead of 2019 5G launch…

11/09 – NETWORKSEuropean mobile operators bring forward 5G plansGlobal 5G connections to reach 340m by 2021 as European optimism increases forecasts…

11/09 – GAMINGNvidia shows how GeForce Now 5G streaming could make high-end gaming hardware irrelevantHitting 60 fps in Full HD resolution with no need for a beefy gaming laptop…

10/09 – NETWORKSCityFibre SDN rollout to speed up 5G deployments and enable 10GbpsCityFibre agrees deal with Calix to smarten its network..

10/09 – NETWORKSEricsson radio updates and transport partnerships to accelerate 5G deploymentsEricsson says a series of developments will make it easier and quicker to deploy 5G…

08/09 – NETWORKSHow 5G will make our streaming dreams come trueZero buffering, no waiting. Will 5G lead the way?

07/09 – FEATURE Inside the 5G factory: How Nokia’s research aids its own productionNokia’s Oulu facility has been involved in every generation of mobile technology…

05/09 – NETWORKSSan Marino will have Europe’s first 5G networkMicrostate will be a testbed for TIM…

05/09 – NETWORKSChina considers merging two major mobile operators in 5G pushMerger would create world’s second largest mobile operator…

04/09 – PRODUCTSUK”s ‘first’ large-scale 5G hub to test digital health apps in 2019West Midlands will become UK’s first 5G hub…

31/08 – ANALYSISGolf’s digital ambitions make it an unlikely 5G pioneerGolf looks to new technologies – including 5G…

31/08 – NETWORKSGerman operators will have no rural obligation for 5G5G spectrum auction will take place in 2019…

30/08 – DEVICESLarger screens and 5G to drive smartphone growth through to 2022Smartphone market ‘generally healthy’ despite recent dip…

28/08 – NETWORKSGerman regulator calls for fourth operator for 5GCompetition chief believes new entrant will kickstart German 5G…

28/08 – NETWORKSNokia secures €500m EU loan for 5G researchNew funding will accelerate 5G technology R&D…

23/08 – NETWORKSMajor 5G trends become more apparent as first network launch nearsThe past seven days have been a long time in the world of 5G…

23/08 – ANALYSISHuawei & ZTE banned from Australia 5G networksAustralian government says 5G architecture makes it too risky…

22/08 – PRODUCTSQualcomm to start shipping its 5G modemsHowever chipmaker says it doesn’t expect 5G phones to launch this year…

22/08 – NETWORKSSpeed takes centre stage as operators ramp up 5G testingReport suggests 82 per cent of mobile operators worldwide are testing 5G…

22/08 – DEVICESNokia expects to make €3 from every 5G smartphoneFinnish giant sets rate for its essential 5G patents…

20/08 – NETWORKSGovernment to test 5G on UK railwaysDCMS invites participants for pilot to see how 5G can improve transport sector…

20/08 – NETWORKSVerizon and Nokia test 5G with a moving vehiclePartners make progress in mobile broadband and connected car apps…

17/08 – NETWORKS5G network slicing could be worth £51bn to mobile operatorsResearchers say efforts by operators and vendors could bear fruit…

16/08 – NETWORKSCisco posts healthy revenues ahead of 5G pushCisco is happy with innovation roadmap as it prepares for next generation networks…

16/08 – NETWORKSTelstra switches on 5G for the Gold Coast, but wider availability remains murkyAustralian telcos Optus and Vodafone say there’s a long road ahead…

15/08 – NETWORKSO2 tests light-based wireless transmission ahead of 5G tests – Li-Fi is pitched as a Wi-Fi alternative…

15/08 – DEVICESLG to launch ‘first 5G smartphone’ in 2019LG and Sprint will release a 5G-ready device in the US next year…

13/08 – NETWORKSEricsson hopes US 5G investments will speed up deploymentsEricsson makes investments in 5G R&D…

08/08 – NETWORKSSamsung invests billions in 5G and AISamsung’s £17bn investment programme looks to guard against smartphone slowdown…

07/08 – NETWORKSUS set to lose out to China in 5G raceDeloitte report urges policymakers to promote investment…

02/08 – DEVICESMoto Z3 is the world’s first 5G-upgradable smartphone, say Motorola and VerizonThe first 5G-almost-ready smartphone…

02/08 – OPERATORSThree focuses on 5G after revenue and customer risesThree now boasts 10.1m customers across the UK…

(Image: © O2)

31/07 – DEVICESLenovo says it’ll be the first to launch a 5G smartphoneCould be here before the end of the year…

30/07 – NETWORKSNokia and T-Mobile ink $3.5bn 5G network dealUS operator presses ahead with 5G rollout plans…

27/07 – OPERATORSMobile helps BT Q1 results ahead of 5G trialsConsumer division continues to offset BT business decline…

26/07 – OPERATORSO2 invites FTSE 500 to trial its 5GO2 presses ahead with 5G tests as it adds more customers…

26/07 – OPERATORSNokia looks to 5G after sales slowdownNokia says drop is to be expected but is confident for second half of 2018…

26/07 – OPERATORSSky Mobile extends O2 MVNO agreement to cover 5GSky Mobile now has 500,000 customers across the UK…

23/07 – REGULATIONUK Government promises new regulations and investment for full fibre and 5GGovernment report outlines plans to deliver fibre to entire UK by 2033…

23/07 – PRODUCTSQualcomm’s mmWave antennas pave way for first 5G smartphonesThe first 5G smartphones should arrive in 2019…

20/07 – NETWORKSBarriers to 5G could stop UK being a global leaderBSG report identifies issues and resolutions…

18/07 – NETWORKSSouth Korea plans 2019 5G launch“Korea 5G Day” will see new networks introduced a year ahead of schedule…

10/07 – NETWORKSChina Mobile, Intel and Huawei complete 5G interoperability testingTests pave way for China Mobile 5G launch next year…

09/07 – NETWORKSSSE Enterprise Telecoms unbundles BT exchanges to boost broadband and Three 5GSSE Enterprise Telecoms doubles its reach…

03/07 – NETWORKSSamsung, Cisco and Orange hold multi-vendor 5G FWA trialFWA will deliver a fixed-like broadband experience when 5G launches…

29/06 – DEVICESOnePlus 7 could support 5G and be sold by US carriersBut don’t expect it for a while…

28/06 – NETWORKS“World’s first” 5G network launchesFinnish operator Elisa claims global first in launching a commercial 5G network…

27/06  – ANALYSISThe World Cup and 5G: the trials you need to know about5G will change how you watch football forever…

25/06 – NETWORKSUK ‘needs shared spectrum’ for 5GOfcom urged to rethink 5G spectrum auction to ensure fairer rollout…

20/06 – NETWORKSVodafone launches 5G trials in seven UK citiesVodafone to hold trials later this year with plans for a 2020 5G launch…

19/06 – NETWORKSMobile signal woes ‘strengthens’ business case for 5GOnly half of mobile users in the UK are happy with their speeds, but willing to pay more for faster service…

15/06 – NETWORKSFirst standalone 5G network standard approved3GPP finalizes ‘Release 15’ of 5G after three years of work, meaning networks are on the way this year…

14/06 – ANALYSISThree CEO: 5G capacity is a ‘big opportunity’ to lead UK marketDave Dyson says Three’s spectrum holdings mean it could be the UK’s 5G leader…

13/06 – NETWORKSVodafone: 5G smartphone uncertainty means focus on core network and IoTVodafone UK CTO says 5G will be a gamechanger, but smartphone innovation in the 4G era won’t be matched…

12/06 – NETWORKS5G networks still set to arrive this yearEricsson report suggests Europe will fall behind US and Asia on 5G adoption…

11/06 – NETWORKS‘First ever’ UK 5G report paints rosy pictureUK’s 5G ambitions rely heavily on startup and research community…

06/06 – ANALYSISEU telecoms rule changes will hinder rather than help 5G, claim industry Telecoms groups label the new EU code a “missed opportunity”…

06/06 – NETWORKS EE to switch on ‘UK’s first’ 5G trial in LondonResidents and businesses in Tech City will get chance to try out 5G…

05/06 – PRODUCTS5G PCs coming from Intel and Sprint next yearUS telecoms giant Sprint has joined the race to bring 5G to the masses, announcing at Computex 2018 to start shipping Intel-powered 5G computers next year…

01/06 – ANALYSIS5G UK – How far away are we really?5G will deliver immediate benefits in 2019, but the true mobile revolution will take time…

25/05 – POLICYMobile industry ‘shouldn’t wait’ for 5G to roll out small cellsSmall cells will be essential for delivering the 5G vision but industry warns there is no time too wait…

25/05 – POLICYNordic Prime Ministers reach agreement to support 5GJoint agreement is welcomed by Nokia, Ericsson and regional operators…

22/05 – NETWORKSQualcomm details 5G small cell platformQualcomm wants to help operators and network equipment manufacturers densify 5G networks…

18/05 – NETWORKSVerizon to bring 5G to Los Angeles in 2018Verizon says America’s second largest city will be its next 5G location…

16/05 – NETWORKSMobile IoT networks to be a ‘core component’ of 5GGSMA says NB-IoT and LTE-M deployments are paving the way for massive IoT powered by 5G…

14/05 – NETWORKS5G and network convergence drives growth of carrier-grade Wi-Fi marketFixed and mobile operators look to densify network infrastructure…

08/05 – PRODUCTSWhy self-driving vehicles could be the biggest winner in a 5G worldTelefónica tells us why autonomous vehicles are set to be a key 5G use case…

08/05 – NETWORKSVerizon and Samsung get 5G regulatory boostVerizon and Samsung make major headway towards 5G…

03/05 – NETWORKSDeutsche Telekom holds live 5G NR trial in BerlinGerman operator says test will see how 5G NR behaves in real world…

02/05 – ANALYSISWhy T-Mobile and Sprint merger would give the US a 5G leadA truly national 5G network could ensure the US retains its advantage…

01/05 – NETWORKSThree futureproofs backend infrastructure for 5GThree and SSE Enterprise Telecoms deal with start with data centre connectivity…

30/04 – NETWORKST-Mobile and Sprint merger promises 5G progress in the USAmerica’s third and fourth largest mobile operators are to merge…

18/04 – NETWORKSHuawei dampens 5G expectationsHuawei CEO says consumer might not notice the differences…

17/04 – NETWORKSChina has narrow lead over US in 5G raceGovernment support and industry momentum gives China slight advantage, report says…

16/04 – DEVICES5G anticipation set to slow smartphone salesManufacturers hope for 5G boost as worldwide smartphone demand slows…

13/04 – NETWORKSWhat does the Ofcom 5G auction mean for the UK mobile industry?The long-awaited auction is over, paving the way for 5G…so what next?

12/04 – NETWORKSVodafone hits major UK 5G milestoneVodafone is first UK operator to test 3.4GHz spectrum in preparation for 5G…

09/04 – NETWORKSEurope set be left behind in 5G raceUS and Asia will lead the way in 5G development, claims report…

05/04 – NETWORKSMobile networks fork out £1.4bn for 5G spectrumOfcom publishes the results of its 5G spectrum auction, revealing that the UK’s biggest mobile network operators spent almost £1.4 billion…

28/03 – NETWORKS‘World’s first’ 5G public trial switched on in AustraliaAustralian telco Telstra flips the switch on the world’s first public trial of 5G at the Gold Coast…

28/03 – NETWORKS5G RuralFirst looks at smart farming, spectrum sharing and broadcastingGovernment funded project will use Cisco tech to help transform rural lives…

28/03 – POLICYUK5G group makes bid for global 5G leadershipGovernment and industry backed UK5G looks to establish UK 5G community…

27/03 – NETWORKSGSMA: 5G will be dominant mobile tech in USA by 2025Mobile industry body report shows US will be a 5G leader…

27/03 – NETWORKSTelefonica tests tech that could boost 5G broadbandTelefonica spectral efficiency trials hope to pave the way for better fixed wireless access (FWA)… 

23/03 – NETWORKS5G networks are now just a year awayKorea Telecom plans commercial 5G launch next March…

20/03 – NETWORKSUK 5G spectrum auction gets underwayFive bidders will battle it out for more of the UK’s airwaves…

19/03 – NETWORKSUK university makes major 5G breakthroughUniversity of Kent-based iCIRRUS consortium says Ethernet equipment can help deliver 5G networks…

16/03 – NETWORKSO2 kickstarts the UK’s 5G charm offensive to consumers5G hypetrain moves from industry into the mainstream…

15/03 – NETWORKSDigital minister pledges to eliminate barriers to 5G deploymentMargot James says she wants to work with mobile operators and local government on 5G…

14/03 – NETWORKSO2: 5G will save local councils and households £6bn a yearReport details how smart technologies powered by 5G can improve society…

12/03 – NETWORKSOfcom 5G spectrum auction will start next weekOfcom confirms that bidding for 5G frequencies will begin on 20 March…

12/03 – NETWORKSGovernment reveals £25m prize fund for UK 5G£25m competition will see 5G testbeds located across the UK…

11/03 – DEVICES5G a key factor to seamless VR experience, says Lenovo EMEA PresidentLenovo wants to create memorable experiences for its customers, but is that enough?

09/03 – NETWORKSOfcom plans new rural coverage obligations for 700MHz spectrumOfcom says 700MHz is an important opportunity to improve rural coverage as it plans for 5G future…

05/03 – NETWORKSEU Parliament and US Congress take steps to accelerate 5G legislationEU chambers reach provisional agreement while US Congress to vote on spectrum auction…

05/03 – DEVICESHTC CEO: 5G will turn any VR device into the most powerful in the worldCher Wang says the smartphone still has a role to play in VR…

03/03 – NETWORKSQualcomm hopes 5G vision will stand out from the hypeQualcomm’s influence in the industry is significant, so its 5G roadmap is worth listening too…

02/03 – NETWORKSBT CEO: EE convergence even more important ahead of 5GGavin Patterson says BT never really left mobile and is preparing for converged network era…

28/02 – NETWORKSIntel and NTT DoCoMo prepare 5G plans for Tokyo 2020 OlympicsAfter success at PyeongChang 2018, Intel is stepping up plans for next Olympics…

27/02 – NETWORKSSatellite-supported UK 5G testbed will trial mission critical appsJuniper Networks and Satellite Applications Catapult say satellite cannot be ignored…

27/02 – MOBILEQualcomm looks to make it easier to make 5G phonesLaunch will help OEMs build 5G connectivity into more devices…

27/02 – NETWORKSOfcom confirms six bidders for 5G spectrumAll four mobile operators have been approved, with small cell operator and Hull fixed wireless firm joining…

27/02 – NETWORKSEricsson tells operators: 5G is readyEricsson has agreements with 38 operators around the world as 5G moves from idea to reality…

27/02 – PRODUCTSGet ready for a 5G Internet of the SkyDrones like the Ehang 184 will usher in a 5G-powered autonomous airspace…

26/02 – NETWORKSTelstra plans to ramp up 4G speeds in the lead up to its full 5G rolloutMajor cities in Australia to get increased bandwidth…

26/02 – NETWORKSCisco targets mobile operators with ‘5G Now’Cisco wants to help operators prepare for the next era of networks…

25/02 – MOBILEHuawei reveals 5G-ready modemTest beds for 5G networks will be launched this year, Huawei reveals…

23/02 – NETWORKSWhy PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympics are a 5G milestoneAthletes are making history at the Winter Olympics, but it’s an important event for 5G networks too…

22/02 – NETWORKSO2 reveals UK 5G test bedOperator will test 5G applications at iconic London venue later this year…

19/02 – NETWORKSVodafone and Huawei successfully test IP Microwave backhaul for 5GVodafone and Huawei achieve 2Gbps on IP microwave link, claiming it shows the tech is viable for 5G…

16/02 – NETWORKSWhy startups and research can make the UK a 5G leaderDoes the UK really need to be first to the mark or be an industry powerhouse to be a 5G leader?

16/02 – OPINIONNo time to waste now 5G legal challenges are overFor an industry keen to avoid a repeat of the 3G and 4G auctions, Three’s failed appeal removes a barrier to 5G…

14/02 – MOBILEFiber-like internet and a glimpse of our 5G future are coming to smartphones in 2019Qualcomm’s new mobile modem offering speeds of up to 2Gbps…

14/02 – NETWORKS5G spectrum auction to go ahead after Three’s legal challenge failsThree’s bid to decrease an overall spectrum cap falls on deaf ears and prevents further delay…

12/02 – NETWORKSChina Mobile plans 5G launch in 2019China Mobile joins a select few number of operators planning to beat original 2020 target…

08/02 – MOBILEThe first 5G smartphones are coming in 2019But you won’t see 5G service everywhere by next year…

07/02 – MOBILE5G set to push mobile data use sky-highGiffgaff research estimates customers will use nearly 100GB of mobile data a month by 2025…

05/-2 – NETWORKSTelstra joins Optus on 5G bandwagon, also aiming for 2019 rolloutAustralian carrier Telstra will trial new tech during Commonwealth Games…

05/01 – NETWORKSAT&T set to run 5G trialsCompany to adopt new 3GPP guidelines as it continues push for next-generation networks…

04/01 – NETWORKSSamsung teams up with Verizon on 5GNew service to be launched in Sacramento later this year…

02/02 – NETWORKSOptus 5G network rollout set to begin in early 2019Australian telco Optus announces its plans for 5G rollout…

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What will 5G networks mean for me?

  • Faster download and upload speeds
  • Smoother streaming of online content 
  • Higher-quality voice and video calls 
  • More reliable mobile connections
  • Greater number of connected IoT devices 
  • An expansion of advanced technologies – including self-driving cars and smart cities

How fast will 5G be?

It’s still not exactly known how much faster 5G will be than 4G, as much of the technology is still under development.

That being said, the networks should provide a significant upgrade to current download and upload speeds – with the GSMA proposing minimum download speeds of around 1GBps.

Most estimates expect the average speed of 5G networks to reach 10Gb/s, and some even think transfer rates could reach a whopping 800Gb/s.

This would mean that users could download a full-length HD quality film in a matter of seconds, and that downloading and installing software upgrades would be completed much faster than today.

Will I be able to get 5G networks on my phone?

Existing smartphones, tablet or other devices that were released when 4G networks were the standard may not be able to connect to 5G to begin with, or may incur extra costs to do so. 

However following the 2020 deadline for the initial rollout, we should soon see devices coming with 5G connection as default.

Don’t worry though – although 5G should represent a major step up from current 4G and 3G networks, the new technology won’t immediately replace its predecessor – at least, not to begin with.

Instead, 5G should link in with existing networks to ensure users never lose connection, with the older networks acting as back-up in areas not covered by the new 5G coverage.

So-called “4.5G” networks (also known as LTE-A) are set to fill the gap for the time being, offering connections that are faster than current 4G networks, although only certain countries such as South Korea can benefit from them right now.

Once launched however, implementing 5G may be a slower process. Much like the gradual takeover of 4G networks from the previous generation, existing network infrastructure may need to be upgraded or even replaced in order to deal with the new technology, and homes and businesses may also need to get new services installed.

It’s not yet known how 5G networks will take over from existing networks, but again, much like the rollout of 4G, you may not be able to immediately connect to the new networks without upgrading your technology.

What will a 5G network need?

The GSMA has outlined eight criteria for 5G networks, with a connection needing meet a majority of these in order to qualify as 5G:

  • 1-10Gbps connections to end points in the field (i.e. not theoretical maximum)
  • 1 millisecond end-to-end round trip delay (latency) 
  • 1000x bandwidth per unit area
  • 10-100x number of connected devices 
  • (Perception of) 99.999 per cent availability 
  • (Perception of) 100 per cent coverage
  • 90 per cent reduction in network energy usage 
  • Up to 10 year battery life for low power, machine-type devices 

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The JungleOctober 16, 201810min0

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey Testifies To House Hearing On Company's Transparency and Accountability

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey spoke at the WIRED25 conference in San Francisco on Monday.


Drew Angerer / Getty Images

Social media sites such as Twitter can reinforce certain political viewpoints or biases by surfacing posts they think its users want to see.

It’s a problem that Twitter CEO and co-founder Jack Dorsey admits the company is trying to solve, but he’s not blaming it on the algorithms.

“I think Twitter does contribute to filter bubbles, and I think that’s wrong of us and we need to fix it,” Dorsey said at the WIRED25 conference in San Francisco on Monday.


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Dorsey noted that the site by design allows users to follow certain accounts, which could skew their perception of the world. If users followed a certain topic or interest, they might see more tweets from people with different viewpoints, he said.

Twitter needs to give users more tools to break down these bubbles, Dorsey acknowledged. 

But as social media sites face allegations that it’s suppressing conservative voices, these companies are also grappling with free speech concerns.

Twitter’s stance on freedom of expression isn’t absolute and there are tradeoffs, Dorsey noted. It’s the company’s purpose to “serve the public conversation,” he said, but Twitter believes it can only stand for freedom of expression if its users feel safe and that they’re not being silenced.

“Freedom of expression may adversely impact other fundamental human rights such as privacy such as physical security,” he said.

Infowars and Silicon Valley: Everything you need to know about the tech industry’s free speech debate.

Cambridge Analytica: Everything you need to know about Facebook’s data mining scandal.

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The JungleOctober 16, 20185min0

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) – TomTom (TOM2.AS), the Dutch navigation company, said third-quarter earnings beat expectations, helped by sales of higher margin digital mapping products.

FILE PHOTO: TomTom navigation are seen in front of TomTom displayed logo in this illustration taken July 28, 2017. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/File Photo

The company, which now faces Google (GOOGL.O) as a competitor, said third-quarter core earnings were 62.4 million euros ($72.2 million), compared with 35.5 million euros a year earlier.

A company-compiled consensus had seen earnings for the quarter before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) at 41 million euros.

On Sept. 18 TomTom shares lost a quarter of their value in one day as Google announced a far-reaching supply deal with a group of carmakers including Renault (RENA.PA), Nissan (7201.T) and Mitsubishi (7211.T).

Analysts said that would relegate TomTom to a third place position in the mapping market.

TomTom, which this month announced plans to sell its fleet management business to focus on making digital maps used in highly automated driving — the business on which it has pinned its future — said it has seen “strong interest” for the fleet subsidiary valued at roughly 700 million euros.

CEO and co-founder Harold Goddijn said that a 36 percent increase in operating revenue and new deals with Peugeot (PEUP.PA) and BMW (BMWG.DE) showed the viability of the company’s products.

Group sales were fractionally higher in the third quarter at 220 million euros, from 219 million euros in the third quarter of 2017, as sales of the company’s traditional satnav devices continued to fall, offset by rising sales of digital mapping technology to carmakers, as well as to Apple (AAPL.O) and Uber[UBER.UL].

The company raised its full-year revenue outlook to 850 million euros from 825 million euros, but said that a contract announced in 2016 to provide location and navigation services to Volvo had ended.

Reporting by Toby Sterling; Editing by Subhranshu Sahu and Louise Heavens

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The JungleOctober 16, 20185min0


During the Adobe Max event in Los Angeles, HP Inc. announced a number of new devices geared towards delivering the next generation of technology solutions to creative professionals.

The company is combining the power of its Z by HP portfolio with its print and packaging capabilities to curate the ultimate experience for creators. The new Z by HP portfolio includes both mobile and desktop devices to deliver the powerful productivity, versatility and security today’s creative professionals need to do their best work.

Director of Workstations, Thin Clients, Retail Solutions and Immersive Computing, EMEA at HP Inc, Gwen Coble offered further details on the company’s new products for creatives, saying:

“Today’s creatives need specialized tools and solutions to help them stay in the creative zone, increase their productivity, and create whenever and wherever inspiration strikes. We are listening to the needs of creative pros and investing in innovation that makes it easier for them to unleash their creativity. With the most powerful hardware, feature-rich software and services, as well as innovative programs for creators, HP is reinventing the way the world creates.” 

Empowering creators

The new Z by HP portfolio includes ZBook mobiles, Z desktops such as the HP Z2 Mini and the powerful HPZ8 as well as the HP DreamColor displays.

The HP ZBook Studio, HP ZBook Studio x360, HP ZBook 15 and HP ZBook 17 have all been revamped with greater processing power, innovative security features and bright displays.

The devices now come with six-core Intel Core i9 processors to allow creators to tackle heavier workloads such as video editing and 3D rendering. The expanded memory option of up to 32 GB of memory (expandable up to 128GB on some models) also allows users to work faster even when dealing with large amounts of data.

HP Inc has even added Raid 1 which gives users a mirrored hard drive to back up their creations automatically in case of a drive failure.

The HP ZBook Studio and Studio x360 are also getting a significant boost in graphics performance with the inclusion of a Nvidia Quadro P2000 graphics card.

HP SmartStream Designer

In an effort to unleash creative potential and make the limitless possibilities of print and packaging possible, HP also announced that its HP SmartStream Designer for Designers (D4D) Adobe Illustrator plug-in is now available globally.

The company’s Illustrator plug-in is a suite of “light” design solutions to help users customise and personalise any design through the use of variable text, colour and images. Additionally, the HP SmartStream Mosaic feature within the D4D software allows designers to create seed files which can be manipulated infinitely through the use of algorithms to create unique outcomes in real-time.

Global head of brand innovation at HP Inc., Nancy Janes explained how designers can utilise the new plug-in, saying:

“HP Digital print has the ability to make packaging and print more agile and limitless, but until now there has been a gap between concept and creation. With HP SmartStream D4D, designers can for the first time, play with the powerful software in Adobe Illustrator CC to create memorable and impactful packaging campaigns for global & local brands.” 

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The JungleOctober 16, 201823min0

google-io-2018-7320

Sundar Pichai, the head of Google, has been under intense scrutiny recently. 


James Martin/CNET

Google has been experimenting with a censored search engine that would work in China, but it’s not sure if it will ever launch the service, CEO Sundar Pichai said Monday. 

Pichai, speaking during the Wired25 conference at the SFJazz Center in San Francisco, said Google started the internal project — dubbed Project Dragonfly — to see what was possible in China, a country with such strict censorship laws that many US companies, including Google, don’t operate their services there.

The company has been roiled by reports about Project Dragonfly, the company’s apparent plan to build a censored search engine for China, eight years after initially retreating from the country. At the time of the departure, Google co-founder Sergey Brin, who grew up in the Soviet Union, cited the “totalitarianism” of Chinese policies.


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The new search project has also drawn criticism from Google’s workforce. A handful of employees have reportedly quit over the initiative. And about 1,000 employees signed an open letter asking the company to be transparent about the project and to create an ethical review process for it that includes rank-and-file employees, not just high-level executives.

Google has said little about the project. However, last month, Keith Enright, Google’s chief privacy officer, confirmed during a hearing with the Senate Commerce Committee that there is indeed a Project Dragonfly, but he wouldn’t elaborate.

Monday’s remarks are the first public acknowledgment by Pichai that Google has been working on such a project. 

Pichai noted Google is constantly “balancing our set of values of providing users access of information, freedom of expression, user privacy, but we also follow the rule of law in every country.” China has been a particular challenge, he said. 

“That’s the reason we did the internal project,” he said. “We wanted to learn what it would look like if Google were in China.”

After building the project internally, Google found that it would “be able to serve well over 99 percent of queries,” Pichai said. “There are many, many areas we’d be able to provide info that’s better than what’s available.” 

But he said that Google wants “to balance it with what the conditions would be. It’s very early. We don’t know whether we would or could do this in China, but we felt it was important for us to explore … given how important the market is and how many users there are.”

Pichai’s interview at Wired25 comes as Google, which turned 20 years old last month, faces some of the biggest challenges in the company’s history.

Google and Pichai have been under intense scrutiny recently, especially from Washington, DC. Last month, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testified before the Senate over election security, disinformation and the perceived biases of the companies’ algorithms. Larry Page, CEO of Google’s parent company Alphabet, and Pichai, CEO of Google itself, were invited, but both declined, spurring widespread anger from lawmakers.

Pichai is expected to give his own congressional testimony next month after the midterm elections.

Google has also been hit with allegations of political bias. In August, President Donald Trump accused Google of political bias and having a liberal bent. He tweeted that Google’s search results are “RIGGED,” saying the company is “suppressing voices of Conservatives.” He also tweeted a video claiming Google promoted former President Barack Obama’s State of the Union addresses every January but not his. Trump added the hashtag #StopTheBias.

Google rejected the president’s claim, saying its homepage did promote Trump’s address in January. The company also explained it didn’t promote either Trump’s or Obama’s address from their first years in office because those speeches aren’t technically considered State of the Union addresses. A screenshot from the Internet Archive, which keeps a record of what appears on web domains, backs up Google’s explanation.

Working with the Defense Department

Another controversy is Google’s decision earlier Google earlier this month to pull out of bidding for a $10 billion Pentagon contract after employee protests. Google said that the project may conflict with its principles for ethical use of AI.


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Pichai on Monday said Google plans to keep working with the Defense Department but not when it comes to the use of artificial intelligence for autonomous weaponry. He noted it’s not just Google employees who have been concerned about the use. 

“If you talk about senior researchers working in the field, they’re worried that when you’re so early with powerful tech, how do you thoughtfully work your way through it?” Pichai said. 

“Once we started working on AI, we realized it was different from other things we’ve worked on,” Pichai added. “We commited ourselves to a set of AI principles — kind of articulated our goals on how we would do it. … and things we would not pursue. … It’s something that will evolve over time, but we need to take it very, very seriously.”

He said that while Google is a much bigger company than it was 20 years ago, it still has the same values. But because it has so many users, “with that comes a sense of responsibility now,” he said. “We’re much more deliberate about what we do and how we think about it. When we think about impact, we don’t think about users alone.” It also considers societies, nonprofits, for-profit businesses and other entities, he said.  

Correction at 8:27 p.m. PT: Corrects quote from Sundar Pichai in the ninth paragraph. 

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The JungleOctober 16, 20183min0

(Reuters) – Alphabet Inc’s Google on Monday became the latest company to drop out of a business conference in Saudi Arabia.

A Google sign is seen during the WAIC (World Artificial Intelligence Conference) in Shanghai, China, September 17, 2018. REUTERS/Aly Song

Pressure has mounted on Saudi Arabia since prominent Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, a U.S. resident, Washington Post columnist and critic of Saudi policies, went missing. He was last seen entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2.

Google said in a statement that Google Cloud Chief Executive Diane Greene would not attend the Future Investment Initiative Summit scheduled to be held in Riyadh starting Oct. 23.

Google’s Greene did not offer a reason for her action, and a spokesman declined to elaborate.

Other business leaders who have said they would not attend the conference, including Uber [UBER.UL] Chief Executive Dara Khosrowshahi, said they were concerned about Khashoggi’s disappearance.

Earlier this year Google announced that it would work with a Saudi agency to open five innovation hubs in the country to train aspiring technologists.

Reporting by Arjun Panchadar in Bengaluru Additional reporting by Paresh Dave in San Francisco

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The JungleOctober 16, 20184min0


Apple is not the only tech giant to tell Australia’s Federal Government exactly what it thinks of the proposed decryption law that was entered into Parliament last month. 

A private industry body called The Digital Industry Group Inc (DIGI), representing tech companies like Google, Facebook and Twitter, voiced its concerns over the Assistance and Access Bill 2018 in August, and this has been followed up with criticisms from Mozilla and Cisco.

In a formal submission to the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security, Cisco says the law would “result in the creation of backdoors”, something CEO Chuck Robbins promised would never happen on the company’s equipment, while Mozilla is worried about the integrity of its open-source software.

Sowing distrust

Amongst the 31 submissions presented to the Joint Committee reviewing the draft law, there is a resounding statement that this kind of legislation would sow distrust among customers. 

“For an open source organisation, which would need to close portions of its source code and/or release builds that are not made from its publicly released code bases, this is at odds with the core principles of open source, user expectations, and potentially contractual license obligations,” Mozilla said. 

The networking company added that, “To maintain the trust of its customers, Cisco believes that any form of surveillance technique which is implemented in its products must be publicly disclosed.”

Both companies are concerned with the concept of “technical capability notices” (TCN), a compulsory notice for communication providers to build interception capabilities to decrypt any private message law enforcement wants to lay its hands on.

According to Mozilla, “A TCN is, in effect, an intentional introduction of a security vulnerability,” with the internet company warning it would lead to users disabling automatic updates on their devices.

Cisco is also worried that being compelled to add backdoors into encrypted platforms would lead to user distrust.

Breaking the internet

Even the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) criticised the proposed law, suggesting that compelling companies to build backdoors into secure systems would “introduce a systemic weakness” that would “erode trust in the internet itself”.

“The mere ability to compel internet infrastructure providers’ compliance introduces that vulnerability to the entire system, because it weakens that same trust,” said IAB chair Ted Hardie. “The internet, as a system, moves from one whose characteristics are predictable to one where they are not.”

He added that if similar legislation was introduced by other countries, it would result in the “fragmentation of the internet”.

Despite the opposition, Australia’s Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton is pushing for the bill to be passed, describing the law as “essential”. 

“Given we are talking about nine out of 10 national security investigations now being impeded because of the use of encryption, we need to deal with it. It doesn’t go as far as some people would want, but it is a measured response,” Dutton said.

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The JungleOctober 16, 201820min0

SpaceShipOne Is Donated To National Air And Space Museum

Paul Allen, who co-founded Microsoft with his high school classmate Bill Gates in 1975, has died.


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Paul Allen, an entrepreneur, investor and philanthropist who helped usher in the dawn of the personal computer when he co-founded Microsoft with Bill Gates, has died.

Allen died Monday at the age of 65, his investment company Vulcan announced in a tweet Monday. Allen, a survivor of Hodgkin’s disease, was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 2009. Earlier this month, Allen announced on his website that the disease had returned but that he was going to fight it aggressively and was optimistic.

“I am very grateful for the support I’ve received from my family and friends,” Allen wrote. “And I’ve appreciated the support of everyone on the teams and in the broader community in the past, and count on that support now as I fight this challenge.”

Gates said in a statement he was “heartbroken by the passing of one of my oldest and dearest friends.”

From our early days together at Lakeside School, through our partnership in the creation of Microsoft, to some of our joint philanthropic projects over the years, Paul was a true partner and dear friend. Personal computing would not have existed without him.

But Paul wasn’t content with starting one company. He channeled his intellect and compassion into a second act focused on improving people’s lives and strengthening communities in Seattle and around the world. He was fond of saying, “If it has the potential to do good, then we should do it.” That’s the kind of person he was.

Paul loved life and those around him, and we all cherished him in return. He deserved much more time, but his contributions to the world of technology and philanthropy will live on for generations to come. I will miss him tremendously.

Allen co-founded the software giant with Gates in 1975, but his partnership with Gates began in 1969, when Allen befriended the younger Gates at the private Seattle high school the two attended and began hanging out together in the computer room. The two honed their programming skilled on time-sharing computer systems through the school’s Teletype terminal.

Six years later, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Allen and Gates began working on the programming language Microsoft BASIC after seeing the Altair 8800 — what many consider to be the earliest desktop computer– on the cover of the January 1975 issue of Popular Electronics.

The pair began calling their venture “Micro-Soft” — a name Allen claimed credit for — and by 1978, the young software maker had chalked up its first $1 million in sales. Microsoft truck the motherload in 1981 when it licensed its MS-DOS operating system to IBM for use on its new personal computer. The company shrewdly retained the right to sell its software to other computer makers, setting the stage for a business model that made it the world’s largest software maker.


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Allen left Microsoft in 1982 after being diagnosed with Hodgkin’s disease, from which he recovered fully after several months of radiation therapy.

Allen became one of the richest men in the world when Microsoft went public in 1986, and he used his wealth to purchase the Portland Trail Blazers NBA basketball and Seattle Seahawks NFL football teams. In 1998, he bought a controlling interest in Charter Communications, now the second-largest cable TV provider in the US. He also founded Vulcan to make investments in emerging technologies and donate to philanthropic causes.

Allen was also the sole investor behind SpaceShipOne, a suborbital spacecraft that marked the first phase in the race to privatize space travel. In 2005, it reached a height of more than 100 kilometers — generally considered the boundary of outer space — over the Mojave desert.

In 2011, Allen announced the launch of Stratolaunch Systems, which would build a massive airplane — the world’s largest — to carry a rocket into the sky. The rocket would then disengage, fire its engines and head off toward space with the aim of reaching low Earth orbit.

After his departure from Microsoft, Allen had a falling out with Gates following the publication of Allen’s 2011 book Idea Man. In it, Allen alleged that Gates and the then recently hired (and future CEO) Steve Ballmer sought ways to take ownership stakes from Allen’s share of Microsoft — even when Allen was wrestling with cancer.

After the controversy, Allen appeared on 60 Minutes and said the book was not an act of revenge against Gates, but instead was meant to serve as a record of what happened.

Reaction to Allen’s death was swift and widespread:

Ballmer, in a tweet, called Allen “a truly wonderful, bright and inspiring person — and a great friend. I will miss him.”

Steven Sinofsky, the former president of Microsoft’s Windows division, said in a tweet he was “deeply saddened” by news of Allen’s passing. “Paul was an original and a dear person who did so much to shape lives with computing and his later work in science, community, and research,” Sinofsky wrote.

Jeff Raikes, the former head of Microsoft’s business division and former CEO of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, called Allen an innovator with a big heart.

“Paul was an amazing intellect, quite innovative, as evidenced from his book, Idea Man,” Raikes told CNET. “He had a lot of fabulous ideas. He also had a big heart. And one of the great things about his philanthropy was how he paired his intellect with things that were important to him, like economic mobility and saving elephants from poachers.

“He was an amazing human being,” Raikes said. “The world is going to miss his contributions that came from his intellect and his heart.”

In a statement, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella said Allen’s “contributions to our company, our industry and our community are indispensable. As co-founder of Microsoft, in his own quiet and persistent way, he created magical products, experiences and institutions, and in doing so, he changed the world.

“I have learned so much from him — his inquisitiveness, his curiosity, and push for high standards is something that will continue to inspire me and all of us a Microsoft. Our hearts are with Paul’s family and loved ones. Rest in peace.”

Apple CEO Tim Cook tweeted that the tech world had “lost a pioneer.”

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodall called Allen “the driving force behind keeping the NFL in the Pacific Northwest.”

CNET’s Ian Sherr and Rochelle Garner contributed to this report.

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The JungleOctober 16, 201812min0

(Reuters) – Microsoft Corp (MSFT.O) co-founder Paul Allen, the man who persuaded school-friend Bill Gates to drop out of Harvard to start what became the world’s biggest software company, died on Monday at the age of 65, his family said.

Allen left Microsoft in 1983, before the company became a corporate juggernaut, following a dispute with Gates, but his share of their original partnership allowed him to spend the rest of his life and billions of dollars on yachts, art, rock music, sports teams, brain research and real estate.

Allen died from complications of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, a type of cancer, the Allen family said in a statement.

In early October, Allen had revealed he was being treated for the non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which he also was treated for in 2009. He had an earlier brush with Hodgkin’s lymphoma, another cancer, in the early 1980s before leaving Microsoft.

Music-lover Allen had a list of high-profile friends in the entertainment business, including U2 singer Bono, but preferred to avoid the limelight at his compound on Mercer Island, across Lake Washington from Seattle, where he grew up.

Allen remained loyal to the Pacific Northwest region, directing more than $1 billion to mostly local philanthropic projects, developing Seattle’s South Lake Union tech hub that Amazon.com Inc (AMZN.O) calls home and building the headquarters of his Allen Institute for Brain Science there.

Gates described Allen as following the Microsoft partnership with a “second act” focused on strengthening communities and in a statement said, “I am heartbroken by the passing of one of my oldest and dearest friends.”

Current Microsoft Chief Executive Satya Nadella on Monday called him a “quiet and persistent” man who changed the world.

“He is under-appreciated in Seattle,” said David Brewster, founder of local news website Crosscut.com and the Seattle Weekly newspaper. “He’s remote and reclusive. There’s too much Howard Hughes in the way he behaves for Seattle truly to appreciate a lot of the good that he does.”

Paul Gardner Allen was born in Seattle on Jan. 21, 1953, the son of a librarian father and teacher mother. He was two years older than Gates but when they met in the computer room at the exclusive Lakeside School in Seattle in 1968, they discovered a shared passion.

“In those days we were just goofing around, or so we thought,” Gates recalled in his 1985 book ““The Road Ahead.”

FROM BOSTON TO ALBUQUERQUE

Allen went on to Washington State University but dropped out in 1974 to take a job with Honeywell in Boston. While there, he pestered Gates, who was studying at nearby Harvard, to quit school and join the nascent revolution in personal computing.

Gates finally agreed and in 1975 the two jointly developed BASIC software for the Altair 8800, a clunky desktop computer that cost $400 in kit form.

The pair moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico, close to the Altair’s maker, and formed a company. It was Allen’s idea to call it Micro-Soft, an amalgam of microcomputer and software. The hyphen was later dropped.

Allen was in charge of Microsoft’s technical operations for the company’s first eight years, making him one of the handful of people who created early software such as MS-DOS and Word that enabled the PC revolution and thrust Microsoft to the top.

But he had ceased to be on the cutting edge of software development by the early 1980s. He never displayed the commercial instinct of Gates, who generally is credited with powering Microsoft’s rise to ubiquity in the 1990s.

Allen left Microsoft in 1983 after falling out with Gates and his new lieutenant, Steve Ballmer, in December 1982, only months after being diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. As he recalled in his 2011 memoir “Idea Man,” he overheard Gates and Ballmer secretly plotting to reduce his ownership stake.

“They were bemoaning my recent lack of production and discussing how they might dilute my Microsoft equity by issuing options to themselves and other shareholders,” Allen wrote.

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Gates and Ballmer later apologized but the damage was done and Allen left Microsoft, although he remained on the board until 2000.

CANCER BATTLES

Allen recovered from his cancer after radiation treatment but in 2009 was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, another form of blood cancer. He went into remission in April 2010 but the disease resurfaced in 2018.

Allen held onto his share of the company. His 28 percent stake at Microsoft’s initial public offering in 1986 instantly made him a multi-millionaire.

His wealth peaked at about $30 billion in late 1999, according to Forbes magazine, but Allen was hurt by the sharp decline in Microsoft stock after the dot.com bubble burst in 2000 and some unprofitable technology investments.

In October 2018, Forbes magazine estimated his wealth at $21.7 billion and said he was the 44th richest person in the world.

Allen, the owner of 42 U.S. patents, liked to cast himself as a technology visionary who drove Microsoft’s early success and saw the future of connected computing long before the Internet.

“I expect the personal computer to become the kind of thing that people carry with them, a companion that takes notes, does accounting, gives reminders, handles a thousand personal tasks,” Allen wrote in a column in Personal Computing magazine as far back as 1977, long before portable computers became a reality.

In the same year, he outlined an early vision of what turned out to be the Internet to Microcomputer Interface magazine.

“What I do see is a home terminal that’s connected to a centralized network by phone lines, fiber optics or some other communication system,” he said. “With that system you can perhaps put your car up for sale or look for a house in a different city or check out the price of asparagus at the nearest grocery market or check the price of a stock.”

Allen later called this sweeping idea the “wired world,” which has broadly come to fruition. He was not alone in predicting connected computing but was one of the most prominent.

Yet Allen’s technology ventures after Microsoft, which focused on areas he thought would grow with the advent of the “wired world,” were not as successful. He lost $8 billion in the cable television industry, chiefly with a bad bet on cable company Charter Communications (CHTR.O), while technology ventures he bankrolled such as Metricom, SkyPix and Interval Research were costly failures.

SPORTS TEAMS, A YACHT AND HENDRIX

He had better luck in sports and real estate. Allen bought the Portland Trail Blazers basketball team in 1988 and became a local hero in 1997 when he purchased the Seattle Seahawks football franchise after the previous owner had tried to move the team to California. The Seahawks won the Super Bowl in February 2014 and both franchises are now valued at many times what Allen paid for them.

Allen also made hundreds of millions of dollars redeveloping South Lake Union, a shabby area of downtown Seattle that became a gleaming technology Mecca and site of Amazon.com’s glass “spheres” headquarters.

All the while, the never-married Allen pursued myriad personal projects and pastimes. He owned one of the world’s biggest yachts, the 400-foot (122 meters) Octopus, which was the venue for many lavish parties and the base for scuba expeditions.

A rock ‘n’ roll aficionado, Allen had a band on call to jam with when he wanted, and spent more than $250 million building a museum devoted to his hero, Jimi Hendrix, which morphed into a music and science fiction exhibit designed by Frank Gehry.

He spent millions more on a collection of vintage warplanes and funded the first non-government rocket to make it into space. He also collected priceless antiquities and works by Monet, Rodin and Rothko to put in his extensive art collection.

Like Gates, Allen was a dedicated philanthropist, giving away more than $1.5 billion in his lifetime and pledging to donate more than half his wealth to charity.

Through various vehicles, Allen focused his giving on brain science, motivated by the loss of his mother to Alzheimer’s disease, along with universities and libraries.

Reporting by Bill Rigby; additional reporting by Ismail Shakil in Bangalore; Editing by Bill Trott

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