Science/Nature

Reports of Bigfoot rise when at least 900 black bears are in the area

Reports of Bigfoot rise when at least 900 black bears are in the area

Where black bears are abundant, Bigfoot sightings usually follow – which could make reports of the mythical creature a way to measure American black bear populations Life 28 January 2023 By Corryn Wetzel An American black bear (Bigfoot not pictured) Mark Raycroft / naturepl.com American black bears (Ursus americanus) are being mistaken for Bigfoot throughout …

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Astronomers Detect Spin-Down Glitch in Distant Magnetar

Astronomers Detect Spin-Down Glitch in Distant Magnetar

Magnetars are a special subset of the isolated neutron star family, with X-ray and radio emission mainly powered by the decay of their immense magnetic fields. The post Astronomers Detect Spin-Down Glitch in Distant Magnetar appeared first on Sci.News: Breaking Science News. Source link Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.

Sea spiders can regrow their anuses, scientists discover

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During experiments, some juvenile sea spiders were able to regrow amputated body parts. (Image credit: Shutterstock) (opens in new tab) Sea spiders possess a remarkable, previously unknown ability: They can regrow their rear ends. In a series of experiments, scientists discovered that juveniles from the sea spider species Pycnogonum litorale were able to fully regenerate …

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Star’s sudden 2020 slowdown allows for test of ‘anti-glitch’ theory — ScienceDaily

On Oct. 5, 2020, the rapidly rotating corpse of a long-dead star about 30,000 light years from Earth changed speeds. In a cosmic instant, its spinning slowed. And a few days later, it abruptly started emitting radio waves. Thanks to timely measurements from specialized orbiting telescopes, Rice University astrophysicist Matthew Baring and colleagues were able …

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New test could detect Alzheimer’s disease 3.5 years before clinical diagnosis — ScienceDaily

New research from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King’s College London has established a blood-based test that could be used to predict the risk of Alzheimer’s disease up to 3.5 years before clinical diagnosis. The study, published in the journal Brain, supports the idea that components in the human blood can …

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Black adults in the US are more likely to have had multigenerational family members incarcerated

Black adults in the US are more likely to have had multigenerational family members incarcerated

Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain While previous studies of incarceration and family life have focused on immediate family—parents, partners and children—a new analysis of a nationally representative survey of U.S. adults that asked about siblings, grandparents, grandchildren, cousins, and other extended family members has found that Black adults in the United States are not only more …

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Early Primate Relatives Lived in High Arctic 52 Million Years Ago

Early Primate Relatives Lived in High Arctic 52 Million Years Ago

Paleontologists have described two new species of the early primatomorphan genus Ignacius from Ellesmere Island, Nunavut, Canada. The post Early Primate Relatives Lived in High Arctic 52 Million Years Ago appeared first on Sci.News: Breaking Science News. Source link Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.

Bio-inspired robotic eyes that better estimate motion

Animals’ eyes are extremely efficient, and researchers have been trying to reproduce their function in robots for many years. However, despite the latest improvements in artificial intelligence, a computer’s visual data processing still cannot compete with the speed and accuracy of biological visual systems. When it comes to the visual perception of autonomous robots — …

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Fermi Detects Gamma-Ray Eclipses from Seven ‘Spider’ Binary Systems

Fermi Detects Gamma-Ray Eclipses from Seven ‘Spider’ Binary Systems

Spider binary systems contain a pulsar — the superdense, rapidly rotating remains of a star that exploded as a supernova — that slowly erodes its companion. The post Fermi Detects Gamma-Ray Eclipses from Seven ‘Spider’ Binary Systems appeared first on Sci.News: Breaking Science News. Source link Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by …

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We can reduce homelessness if we follow the science on what works

We can reduce homelessness if we follow the science on what works

Decades of research have shown that focusing on housing, without making sobriety or mental health treatment a prerequisite, is the most effective way to reduce homelessness Society | Comment 26 January 2023 By Maia Szalavitz Many US cities have been clearing encampments of homeless people in the past year Shutterstock/Philip Pilosian In the past few …

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Entangling particles helps improve the accuracy of quantum measurements

Using 19 different quantum computers, scientists demonstrate how entangled particles break limitations in accuracy on the sub-atomic scale. On the scales of atoms and molecules, much of our everyday intuition does not apply, and quantum theories come into play. When scientists work with small enough objects, quantum mechanics imposes some limitations, for example, that not …

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New Species of Duck-Billed Dinosaur Identified in Texas

New Species of Duck-Billed Dinosaur Identified in Texas

Paleontologists have described a previously unrecognized genus and species of hadrosaurid dinosaur from a partial bone found in Texas, the United States. The post New Species of Duck-Billed Dinosaur Identified in Texas appeared first on Sci.News: Breaking Science News. Source link Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.

Watch this person-shaped robot liquify and escape jail, all with the power of magnets — ScienceDaily

Inspired by sea cucumbers, engineers have designed miniature robots that rapidly and reversibly shift between liquid and solid states. On top of being able to shape-shift, the robots are magnetic and can conduct electricity. The researchers put the robots through an obstacle course of mobility and shape-morphing tests in a study publishing January 25 in …

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Comparing airfares instead of seat size fairer indicator of passenger carbon emissions — ScienceDaily

Allocating passenger aircraft emissions using airfares rather than travel class would give a more accurate idea of individual contributions, finds a study led by UCL. Emissions calculators base their estimates on travel class, assuming that someone travelling in a higher class and therefore taking up more space on the plane is responsible for more emissions. …

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The James Webb Telescope detected the coldest ice in the known universe – and it contains the building blocks of life

The James Webb Telescope detected the coldest ice in the known universe – and it contains the building blocks of life

Scientists using the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) have observed and measured the coldest ice in the deepest reaches of an interstellar molecular cloud to date. The frozen molecules measured minus 440 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 263 degrees Celsius), according to new research published Jan. 23 in the journal Nature Astronomy (opens in new tab). Molecular …

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Potential hidden cause of dementia detected — ScienceDaily

A new Cedars-Sinai study suggests that some patients diagnosed with behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) — an incurable condition that robs patients of the ability to control their behavior and cope with daily living — may instead have a cerebrospinal fluid leak, which is often treatable. Researchers say these findings, published in the peer-reviewed journal Alzheimer’s …

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Reviving mechanical computers for use in extreme environments

Putting a modern spin on old tech, scientists create a mechanical computer from metamaterials for situations where electronic computers break down. The concept of a mechanical computer is not something one comes across often anymore. These were early prototypes that performed calculations using levers, links, and gears rather than electronic components. But researchers from Shantou …

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Stunning CT scans of ‘Golden Boy’ mummy from ancient Egypt reveal 49 hidden amulets

Stunning CT scans of ‘Golden Boy’ mummy from ancient Egypt reveal 49 hidden amulets

Incredibly detailed computed tomography (CT scans) of the so-called “Golden Boy,” mummy from ancient Egypt have revealed a hidden trove of 49 amulets, many of which were made of gold. The young mummy earned its nickname because of the dazzling display of wealth, which included a gilded head mask found in the mummy’s sarcophagus. Researchers …

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Scientists unveil least costly carbon capture system to date — ScienceDaily

The need for technology that can capture, remove and repurpose carbon dioxide grows stronger with every CO2 molecule that reaches Earth’s atmosphere. To meet that need, scientists at the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have cleared a new milestone in their efforts to make carbon capture more affordable and widespread. They have created …

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Split-second of evolutionary cellular change could have led to mammals, suggests new hypothesis

Split-second of evolutionary cellular change could have led to mammals, suggests new hypothesis

Polyploidization precedes the final maturation steps during megakaryocyte differentiation. Schematic diagram illustrating megakaryocyte differentiation. Megakaryocyte progenitors (MK-P) originating from an hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) proliferate through normal mitotic divisions until they start to become highly polyploid through a series of aborted cell divisions, or endomitoses, to produce megakaryoblasts. Note that the first tetraploid megakaryoblast contains …

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Webb Reveals Rich Composition of Interstellar Molecular Cloud Ices

Webb Reveals Rich Composition of Interstellar Molecular Cloud Ices

Astronomers using the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope have detected water ice as well as frozen forms of carbonyl sulfide, ammonia, methane, and methanol in a dark molecular cloud called Chamaeleon I. The post Webb Reveals Rich Composition of Interstellar Molecular Cloud Ices appeared first on Sci.News: Breaking Science News. Source link Please enable JavaScript …

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More effective protected areas needed to halt biodiversity loss — ScienceDaily

Protected natural areas of the UK are struggling to halt declines in insects and spiders that have occurred over the past 30 years, according to a new study led by researchers from the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH). Nature reserves, Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs), Special Areas of Conservation and other forms …

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Hubble Spots Two Prominent Stars in Orion Nebula

Hubble Spots Two Prominent Stars in Orion Nebula

Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have taken a detailed image of a small part of the famous Orion Nebula. The post Hubble Spots Two Prominent Stars in Orion Nebula appeared first on Sci.News: Breaking Science News. Source link Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.

Runaway W. Antarctic ice sheet collapse not ‘inevitable’: study

Runaway W. Antarctic ice sheet collapse not ‘inevitable’: study

The Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers in Western Antarctica contain enough ice to put sea levels three meters higher. The runaway collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet—which would trigger catastrophic sea level rise—is not “inevitable”, scientists said Monday following research that tracked the region’s recent response to climate change. As global temperatures rise, there …

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Mysterious ‘sparks’ on the sun could help scientists predict solar flares

Mysterious ‘sparks’ on the sun could help scientists predict solar flares

 Solar flares, powerful bursts of radiation from the sun, are often preceded by a pre-flare spark, scientists have discovered. The finding could lead to better predictions of solar storms, which can disrupt power grids and communications systems on Earth. The scientists made the discovery after digging into years of data from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory …

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Why do horses wear shoes?

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A thoroughbred horse gets shod. (Image credit: jess311 via Getty Images) Horses have been central to human transportation and agriculture for centuries. These symbols of power and speed require hoof care and new shoes every four to six weeks to stay on the job. But why? Horses (Equus caballus) that are domesticated for human use …

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New genetic disorder that causes susceptibility to opportunistic infections — ScienceDaily

An international consortium co-led by Vanderbilt University Medical Center immunogeneticist Rubén Martínez-Barricarte, PhD, has discovered a new genetic disorder that causes immunodeficiency and profound susceptibility to opportunistic infections including a life-threatening fungal pneumonia. The discovery, reported Jan. 20 in the journal Science Immunology, will help identify people who carry this in-born error of immunity (IEI). …

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Is the Yellowstone supervolcano really ‘due’ for an eruption?

Who invented the toilet? | Live Science

A hydrothermal feature at Yellowstone National Park. (Image credit: zrfphoto via Getty Images) Beneath Yellowstone National Park, a vast region of spectacular wilderness visited by around 3 million people annually (opens in new tab), lurks one of the largest volcanoes in the world.  The Yellowstone Caldera — the cauldron-like basin at the summit of the …

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Study: Some Tropical Pitcher Plants Capture Mammal Droppings

Study: Some Tropical Pitcher Plants Capture Mammal Droppings

Some Nepenthes species are capturing more nitrogen, and therefore nutrients, from mammal droppings as compared to those that capture insects. The post Study: Some Tropical Pitcher Plants Capture Mammal Droppings appeared first on Sci.News: Breaking Science News. Source link Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.

California storms didn’t solve the state’s drought and water crisis

California storms didn’t solve the state’s drought and water crisis

After weeks of intense rain and flooding, most of California’s reservoirs are holding more water than usual for this time of year, but groundwater is still not replenished Environment 20 January 2023 By James Dinneen The Nicasio Reservoir in California at 100 per cent capacity after a series of atmospheric river events in January 2023 …

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The invention could benefit pharmaceutical, automotive, food processing, carbon capture and other industries — ScienceDaily

Aerosols are tiny particles that can have a significant impact on Earth’s climate and human health. For example, these microdroplets can reflect incoming sunlight back to outer space, helping to cool a warming planet. Or they can be used to administer drugs to the lungs, especially to treat respiratory ailments. Thus, the ability to more …

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Vulnerability of red sea urchins to climate change depends on location — ScienceDaily

A new study of red sea urchins, a commercially valuable species, investigated how different populations respond to changes in their environments. The results show that red sea urchin populations in Northern and Southern California are adapted to their local conditions but differ in their vulnerability to the environmental changes expected to occur in the future …

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Astronomers weighed the Milky Way, and found huge amounts of matter missing

Astronomers weighed the Milky Way, and found huge amounts of matter missing

For over a decade now, so-called fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been puzzling scientists. These ultra-short-lived, bright flashes of radio waves across the sky happen all day, but no one yet knows what causes them.  Although FRBs are still a mystery, new observations of this strange phenomenon may actually help astronomers learn more about our …

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Crab deaths on UK coast may be caused by unknown disease, finds report

Crab deaths on UK coast may be caused by unknown disease, finds report

A scientific committee has ruled out chemical poisoning and algae as explanations for the deaths of crustaceans in north-east England, saying a new disease is the most likely cause Environment 20 January 2023 By Jason Arunn Murugesu Dead crabs and lobsters found on the coast of north-east England in 2022 Sally Bunce The mass death …

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Serve vegan burgers in schools to trigger shift from meat, says report

Serve vegan burgers in schools to trigger shift from meat, says report

Researchers urge governments to use public procurement of plant-based proteins to bring about cascading changes that help tackle climate change Environment 20 January 2023 By Madeleine Cuff Eating more plant-based food would mean less land is needed for livestock farming Brent Hofacker/Alamy Stock Photo Governments should force prisons, schools, hospitals and other state-run institutions to …

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Squid tissues and chemistry combine for versatile hydrogels

Squid tissues and chemistry combine for versatile hydrogels

The new squid/synthetic polymer double-network gel developed in this study. Credit: Tasuku Nakajima Researchers at Hokkaido University in Japan have combined natural squid tissues with synthetic polymers to develop a strong and versatile hydrogel that mimics many of the unique properties of biological tissues. Hydrogels are polymer networks containing large quantities of water, and are …

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Paleontologists Find 256 Fossil Titanosaur Eggs in India

Paleontologists Find 256 Fossil Titanosaur Eggs in India

Paleontologists in India have documented 92 clutches containing a total of 256 fossilized eggs of titanosaur sauropods. The post Paleontologists Find 256 Fossil Titanosaur Eggs in India appeared first on Sci.News: Breaking Science News. Source link Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.

Domesticated chickens could wipe out their wild ancestors — by having sex with them

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A mating pair of wild red junglefowl (female on left, male on right).  (Image credit: Shutterstock) (opens in new tab) Red junglefowl are under threat from domesticated chickens that want to mate with them, a new study shows. These wild birds, the ancestors of domesticated chickens, risk losing their genetic diversity because they are breeding …

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Room temperature quantum magnets switch states trillions of times per second — ScienceDaily

A class of nonvolatile memory devices, called MRAM, based on quantum magnetic materials, can offer a thousandfold performance beyond current state-of-the-art memory devices. The materials known as antiferromagnets were previously demonstrated to store stable memory states, but were difficult to read from. This new study paves an efficient way for reading the memory states, with …

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Kelp farms could help reduce coastal marine pollution

Kelp farms could help reduce coastal marine pollution

Sugar kelp grows at an experimental farm near Juneau. Credit: Schery Umanzor The water-filtering abilities of farmed kelp could help reduce marine pollution in coastal areas, according to a new University of Alaska Fairbanks-led study. The paper, published in the January issue of Aquaculture Journal, analyzed carbon and nitrogen levels at two mixed-species kelp farms …

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Microelectronics give researchers a remote control for biological robots — ScienceDaily

First, they walked. Then, they saw the light. Now, miniature biological robots have gained a new trick: remote control. The hybrid “eBiobots” are the first to combine soft materials, living muscle and microelectronics, said researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Northwestern University and collaborating institutions. They described their centimeter-scale biological machines in the journal …

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Researchers Find Five New Meteorites in Antarctica

Researchers Find Five New Meteorites in Antarctica

A team of meteorite hunters from Belgium and the United States has found five new Antarctic meteorites, including one that weighs 7.6 kg. The post Researchers Find Five New Meteorites in Antarctica appeared first on Sci.News: Breaking Science News. Source link Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.

Local Fluctuations in Nuclear Strong Force May Influence Spin Orientation of Particles

Local Fluctuations in Nuclear Strong Force May Influence Spin Orientation of Particles

Physicists from the STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider have tracked pairs of positively and negatively charged kaons, the decay products of phi mesons. The post Local Fluctuations in Nuclear Strong Force May Influence Spin Orientation of Particles appeared first on Sci.News: Breaking Science News. Source link Please enable JavaScript to view the …

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Vagus nerve receptors may be key to controlling inflammation

Vagus nerve receptors may be key to controlling inflammation

Researchers identified receptors in the vagus nerves of mice that help control inflammation, which could improve treatments for conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis where the pathway may malfunction Health 18 January 2023 By Grace Wade Conditions such as arthritis could be treated by targeting receptors in the vagus nerve that control inflammation Kobus Louw/Getty Images …

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Systematic framework to compare performance of plastics recycling approaches — ScienceDaily

With only a small percentage of plastics recycled, determining the best way to recycle and reuse these materials may enable higher adoption of plastics recycling and reduce plastic waste pollution. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) examined the benefits and trade-offs of current and emerging technologies for recycling …

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Bloom entombed in amber is the largest fossilized flower ever found

Bloom entombed in amber is the largest fossilized flower ever found

Scientists have officially identified the largest fossilized flower ever recorded: a nearly 40 million-year-old flower entombed in a hunk of amber, according to a study published Jan. 12 in the journal Scientific Reports (opens in new tab). The flower had been known for 150 years but has only now been definitively identified as a new …

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Radio Astronomers Discover New Supernova Remnants in Milky Way Galaxy

Radio Astronomers Discover New Supernova Remnants in Milky Way Galaxy

Using the ASKAP and Parkes radio telescopes in Australia, astronomers have observed a large section of the Galactic plane of the Milky Way. The post Radio Astronomers Discover New Supernova Remnants in Milky Way Galaxy appeared first on Sci.News: Breaking Science News. Source link Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.

Scientists create cyborg bacteria – Advanced Science News

Scientists create cyborg bacteria – Advanced Science News

Incorporating polymer skeletons inside bacteria stops them from replicating and results in cyborg cells that are half living, half artificial. A “holy grail” in synthetic biology is the creation of fully programmable biomachines created by modifying living cells. These living cyborgs, if you will, have found proof-of-concept applications in areas such as living therapeutics, bioremediation, …

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Inclusive gender signs connected to positive attitudes toward trans, nonbinary people

Something as simple as seeing all-gender signs in public places, like restrooms, was linked to adolescents’ acceptance of transgender and nonbinary people, a new study has found. In one of the first studies of its kind, researchers conducted an online experiment with a nationally representative sample of 319 adolescents aged 12 to 17, testing how …

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Genetically engineering rice to have better salt tolerance could allow it to be grown in places it would otherwise fail — ScienceDaily

Genetically modified rice could be key to tackling food shortages caused by climate change Reducing the number of stomata that rice have makes them more tolerant to salt water, according to researchers at the University of Sheffield As sea levels rise, seawater is reaching places it previously wouldn’t, causing increasing damage to crops Sheffield scientists …

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Hubble Space Telescope Spies UGC 7983

Hubble Space Telescope Spies UGC 7983

UGC 7983 is a dwarf irregular galaxy, a type thought to be similar to the very earliest galaxies in the Universe. The post Hubble Space Telescope Spies UGC 7983 appeared first on Sci.News: Breaking Science News. Source link Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.

Runaway West Antarctic ice retreat can be slowed by climate-driven changes in ocean temperature

Runaway West Antarctic ice retreat can be slowed by climate-driven changes in ocean temperature

Getz Ice Shelf of the Amundsen Sector, West Antarctica, and sea ice offshore. Credit: NASA/USGS, processed by Dr Frazer Christie, Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge. New research finds that ice-sheet-wide collapse in West Antarctica isn’t inevitable: the pace of ice loss varies according to regional differences in atmosphere and ocean circulation. An international …

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Elusive ‘Buchdahl stars’ are black holes without event horizons. But do they really exist?

Elusive ‘Buchdahl stars’ are black holes without event horizons. But do they really exist?

An elusive object in space has posed a riddle for scientists. It looks like a black hole. It acts like a black hole. It may even smell like a black hole. But it has one crucial difference: It has no event horizon, meaning that you can escape its gravitational clutches if you try hard enough. …

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What is Blue Monday and is it really the most depressing day of the year?

What is Blue Monday and is it really the most depressing day of the year?

“Blue Monday” falls every year on the third Monday in January. It is, supposedly, the most depressing day of the year, often attributed to a cocktail of poor weather, the post-Christmas lull, stretched finances and unattainable New Year’s resolutions.  But is it actually the saddest day of the year? The short answer is “no.” The …

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‘Disastrous’ flood warning in California as another storm hits

‘Disastrous’ flood warning in California as another storm hits

Farm workers dig an irrigation canal around a field of strawberries as the Salinas River begins to overflow its banks on January 13, 2023 in California. Disastrous flooding could hit parts of California this weekend, forecasters warned Friday, as the eighth storm in succession barreled in over land already too waterlogged to soak up any …

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Bilingual kids could lead in ocean environmental action — ScienceDaily

Participation in environmental education programs can motivate children across diverse language groups to act responsibly toward the environment, a recent study from North Carolina State University researchers suggests. In the study, researchers surveyed 644 elementary school children about how motivated they were to act in ways that would help the environment — such as by …

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Webb Probes Most Massive Star-Forming Region of Small Magellanic Cloud

Webb Probes Most Massive Star-Forming Region of Small Magellanic Cloud

Astronomers using the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope have revealed many new pockets of star formation in NCG 346, an open star cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud. The post Webb Probes Most Massive Star-Forming Region of Small Magellanic Cloud appeared first on Sci.News: Breaking Science News. Source link Please enable JavaScript to view the …

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AI discovers new nanostructures — ScienceDaily

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have successfully demonstrated that autonomous methods can discover new materials. The artificial intelligence (AI)-driven technique led to the discovery of three new nanostructures, including a first-of-its-kind nanoscale “ladder.” The research was published today in Science Advances. The newly discovered structures were formed by a …

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34-Million-Year-Old Baltic Amber Preserves Exceptionally Large Flower

34-Million-Year-Old Baltic Amber Preserves Exceptionally Large Flower

Symplocos kowalewskii, an exceptionally large flower from Baltic amber, measures 2.8 cm (1.1 inches) across — about three times as large as most flower inclusions. The post 34-Million-Year-Old Baltic Amber Preserves Exceptionally Large Flower appeared first on Sci.News: Breaking Science News. Source link Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.

New techniques for accurate measurements of tiny quantum objects

New techniques for accurate measurements of tiny quantum objects

Experimental implementation of optimal collective measurements using quantum computers. a,b, Probe states are sent to the quantum computers (QC) individually for the single-copy measurement (a) and in pairs for the two-copy measurement (b). c,d, The qubit probes experience rotations, θx and θy, about the x and y axes of the Bloch sphere (c) before undergoing …

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With fewer disruptive studies, is science becoming an echo chamber?

An analysis of 45 million papers and 3.9 million patents since 1945 shows that the rate of disruptiveness in science is steeply declining. Since 1945, the rate of disruptive scientific papers and patents is rapidly declining. This is the conclusion of a recent study, which analyzed 45 million papers and 3.9 million patents. Does this mean that …

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